Genevieve Demarco

POWER

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“Power” takes a deliberately broad approach in exploring the roots of its meaning, as it encourages the viewer to recognize their own capacity to influence. This collection of paintings approaches conceptualization by addressing the basic principles of the influence of power and how it can be used to educate. The paintings created for “Power” are all impressions of my inner-thoughts, but without context, these images can render cryptic to the viewer. My objective is an attempt to conceptualize the influence of power through provocation of thought. The viewer is challenged to recognize that the images do not stand alone without further inquiry.

 

This exhibition has given me an opportunity to share how I perceive the world. Power is the ability to influence others. Influence is the capacity to have an effect of on someone’s character, which is usually an unconscious effort. Continuing the usage of acrylic paints and oil sticks, this collection is synonymous with intentionality, as my development seeks to keep the conversation surrounding my ideas about specifically what I present to you. My effort to keep control of the conversation takes on the role of educator by inciting my own creative genius. There is an inherent influence that takes place when viewing the pieces in this collection.

 

From every thought that inhabits our minds to the unconscious actions that become daily habits, the influence of creativity is often deliberate. The genius of influence happens effortlessly when the freedom to be creative, both visually and intellectually, has space with no restrictions. The images I have created for “Power” address various subject matter, at times offering social commentary.  

 

A genius is one of exceptional intellectual or creative power. These paintings are simplistic ideas where intellectual creativity maintains that the ability to influence others comes naturally--that each mind has an innate capacity to influence through their own creative power.

 

What I absorb is reflected onto canvas where my thoughts are deconstructed and my paintings reflect my observation of the world and its climate. I use the power of my creative influence in an unrestricted manner leaving the viewer unaware of its impact on their perception, which relinquishes all responsibilities of defining to the artist. This inherently assigns creative power to the genius—to the creator, not the influence.  

 

54x54. Acrylic/ Oil Stick on Canvas

The National Anthem

54x54

Acrylic/ Oil Stick on Canvas

$1500

 

 

Description: 

 

Oh, say can you see,
By the dawn's early light,
What so proudly we hailed,
At the twilight's last gleaming?
Whose broad stripes and bright stars,
Through the perilous fight,
O'er the ramparts we watched,
Were so gallantly streaming.
And the rocket's red glare,
The bombs bursting in air,
Gave proof through the night,
That our flag was still there.
Oh say does that star spangled banner yet wave,
For the land of the free, and the home of the brave.

Three Strikes Law

54x54

Acrylic/ Oil Stick on Canvas

$1500

 

KING (Letter from Birmingham Jail)

24x36

Acrylic/ Oil Stick on Canvas 

Description:

 

Bill Clinton signed a bill into action in 1994 that included a "three strikes" rule that meant anyone convicted of a serious violent crime who had two or more prior convictions, including drug crimes, was given a life sentence. This led to mass incarceration. 

 

For more information: https://www.justice.gov/usam/criminal-resource-manual-1032-sentencing-enhancement-three-strikes-law

 

 

Description:

 

The Letter from Birmingham Jail, also known as the Letter from Birmingham City Jail and The Negro Is Your Brother, is an open letter written on April 16, 1963, by Martin Luther King, Jr. The letter defends the strategy of nonviolent resistance to racism.

 

Link to the letter:

https://www.africa.upenn.edu/Articles_Gen/Letter_Birmingham.html

Pigford 2

24x36

Acrylic/ Oil Stick on Canvas

Description:

 

Pigford v. Glickman was a class-action lawsuit brought in 1997. The suit, in which farmer Timothy Pigford sued then-Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman, resulted in a court-approved agreement in 1999 to settle claims of discrimination that occurred between 1983 and 1997. But tens of thousands of black farmers missed the deadline for filing claims. Congress took testimony on complaints that inadequate notice and poor legal representation were to blame for the late claims and passed a law in 2008 that gave the late filers the right to have their cases heard on the merits. The 2008 law provided $100 million to settle the additional claims. Congress in 2010 appropriated another $1.15 billion. The second settlement came to be known as Pigford II.

KEEPSEAGLE VS VILSACK

18x22

Acrylic/ Oil Stick on Canvas

Description:

 

On April 28, 2011, U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan today granted final approval of the historic settlement between Native American farmers and ranchers and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), in a case known as Keepseagle v. Vilsack.  Resolving a nationwide class action lawsuit, the Keepseagle settlement agreement requires USDA to pay $680 million in damages to thousands of Native Americans, to forgive up to $80 million in outstanding farm loan debt, and to improve the farm loan services USDA provides to Native Americans. 

“Final approval of the Keepseagle settlement marks the end of an unfortunate chapter in our nation’s history where USDA’s credit discrimination against Native Americans was the norm.  Under this settlement, Native American farmers and ranchers will finally receive the compensation and justice they deserve, and we will undertake a process to ensure that the USDA treats Native Americans equally and fairly.” said lead plaintiffs’ attorney Joseph M. Sellers, of Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll, PLLC.

Untitled 2

48x48

Acrylic/ Oil Stick on Canvas

Untitled

18x22

Acrylic/ Oil Stick on Canvas

BLACK FACE

18x22

Acrylic/ Oil Stick on Canvas

Definition:

 

The makeup used by a nonblack performer playing a black role. The role played is typically comedic or musical and usually is considered offensive.

18:21 (Proverbs)

24x28

Acrylic/ Oil Stick on Canvas

Description:

 

Proverbs 18:21 King James -

Death and life are in the power of the tongue: and they that love it shall eat the fruit thereof.

HEMLOCK

16x20

Acrylic/ Oil Stick on Canvas

Description:

A highly poisonous plant.

POWER

30x40

Acrylic/ Oil Stick on Canvas

 

Collaboration with 

Vickie Wilson

Please contact gdemarcoart@gmail.com with all inquiries